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If you didn’t know, Black British actors are taking over Hollywood! From Naomie Harris to David Oyelowo to Idris Elba, Black actors are crossing the pond and nabbing roles.

But are they roles that could have gone to African-American actors? Samuel L. Jackson certainly thinks so, and stirred up a little controversy while on Hot 97 earlier this week.

The veteran actor questioned Daniel Kaluuya’s role in Get Out, saying that an  African-American actor may have been better suited for the role.

But one person who didn’t quite agree was British actor John Boyega. Boyega, who starred in the 2015  film Star Wars: The Force Awakens, tweeted a response to Jackson’s comments: “Black brits vs African American. A stupid ass conflict we don’t have time for.”

To Boyega’s point, there’s a need for more roles for BOTH British and American actors of color. But from the looks of things, the Brits are certainly working. Scroll down for 10 actors who stay nabbing what some may deem “African-American” roles.

Idris Elba
The world fell in love with Idris Elba with his starring role as the Baltimore drug lord Stringer Bell on HBO’s The Wire. He has since tried to distance himself from the character, but instead has become an American heartthrob and bonafide movie star with roles in films like Thor, Star Trek Beyond and No Good Deed to name a few.

Gugu Mbatha-Raw first made her mark starring opposite Boris Kodjoe in the short-lived TV drama Undercovers. Later she would star in Belle, playing the mixed-race daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral and a Caribbean slave, and Beyond the Lights, playing an American pop star longing for a normal life.

Before Naomie Harris, Carmen Ejogo or Gugu Mbatha-Raw crossed the pond, Thandie Newton was taking over Hollywood as the new ‘it’ girl rivaling even Halle Berry. Her string of roles were less reflective of her British roots playing the ghost of a young slave girl in Beloved and as U.S. Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice in W.

Carmen Ejogo got her career started hosting Saturday Disney. She made her mark in the U.S. with roles in Sparkle opposite Whitney Houston and playing civil rights leader Coretta Scott King twice – in the films Selma and Boycott.

John Boyega, who is from South London, plays Finn in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. While the role is not American per se, given that the film unfolds in a distant galaxy, Finn speaks with an entirely convincing American accent. He’ll next be seen in Star Wars: Return of The Jedi.

Naomie Harris has played everything from a Bond-girl (Skyfall, Spectre) to Winnie Mandela (Mandela: A Long Walk To Freedom). But her most recent role playing a crack-addict mother  in Moonlight nabbed her an Oscar nomination.

Chiwetel Ejiofor worked alongside Denzel Washington in both the Inside Man and American Gangster before nabbing the role of Solomon Northup, a free African-American who was abducted and enslaved in the mid-19th century, in the Oscar winning film 12 Years A Slave.

David Oyelowo toiled in smaller roles before landing the part of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 2014 civil-rights drama Selma. Now a member of the Academy, Oyelowo says he’s hoping more films about people of color, women and other minorities get nominated in the future.

Marianne Jean-Baptiste gained international success from the Mike Leigh-directed social drama Secrets & Lies (1996). She received both Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nominations for her performance, becoming the first black British actress to be nominated for an Academy Award. Since she has been a mainstay on American TV, most notably for her role on Without A Trace.

Sophie Okonedo won a Tony Award in 2014 for playing the African-American character Ruth Winger in “A Raisin in the Sun” on Broadway. She describes herself as a Jewish, Nigerian Brit, but says she finds far more opportunities for roles in the United States than in Britain.

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FILMS

All Black Everything: Critics Choice Awards Will Be Lit This Year!

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First of all, shout out to all of the Critics’ Choice nominees … job well done! Buuuuuut, super shout out to the Black nominees because, as Issa Rae would say, we’re rooting for everybody Black!

The Critics’ Choice Awards honors the finest in cinematic and television achievement. This year “Get Out” got a lot of love with 5 nods for Best Picture, Best Actor (Daniel Kaluuya), Best Director (Jordan Peele), Best Original Screenplay (Jordan Peele) and Best Sci-Fi or Horror Movie. On the TV side, “black-ish” reigned supreme with 3 nominations for Best Comedy Series, Best Actor in a Comedy Series (Anthony Anderson) and Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series (Jenifer Lewis). Our fave funny girl Tiffany Haddish scored two nominations for Best Supporting Actress and Best Actress in a Comedy, while her film “Girls Trip” got some love in the Best Comedy category.

So many of our other faves including Mary J, Blige, Sterling K. Brown, Tyra Banks and more received nominations as well. Check out the full list below and see the Critics’ Choice Awards when it airs live on the CW Network on January 11th from 8:00 – 10:00pm ET/PT.

FILM NOMINATIONS FOR THE 23rd ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

BEST PICTURE

The Big Sick

Call Me by Your Name

Darkest Hour

Dunkirk

The Florida Project

Get Out

Lady Bird

The Post

The Shape of Water

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

BEST ACTOR

Timothée Chalamet – Call Me by Your Name

James Franco – The Disaster Artist

Jake Gyllenhaal – Stronger

Tom Hanks – The Post

Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out

Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread

Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour

BEST ACTRESS

Jessica Chastain – Molly’s Game

Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water

Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Margot Robbie – I, Tonya

Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird

Meryl Streep – The Post

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project

Armie Hammer – Call Me By Your Name

Richard Jenkins – The Shape of Water

Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Patrick Stewart – Logan

Michael Stuhlbarg – Call Me by Your Name

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Mary J. Blige – Mudbound

Hong Chau – Downsizing

Tiffany Haddish – Girls Trip

Holly Hunter – The Big Sick

Allison Janney – I, Tonya

Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird

Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS

Mckenna Grace – Gifted

Dafne Keen – Logan

Brooklynn Prince – The Florida Project

Millicent Simmonds – Wonderstruck

Jacob Tremblay – Wonder

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

Dunkirk

Lady Bird

Mudbound

The Post

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

BEST DIRECTOR

Guillermo del Toro – The Shape of Water

Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird

Martin McDonagh – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Christopher Nolan – Dunkirk

Luca Guadagnino – Call Me By Your Name

Jordan Peele – Get Out

Steven Spielberg – The Post

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor – The Shape of Water

Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird

Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani – The Big Sick

Liz Hannah and Josh Singer – The Post

Martin McDonagh – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Jordan Peele – Get Out

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

James Ivory – Call Me by Your Name

Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber – The Disaster Artist

Dee Rees and Virgil Williams – Mudbound

Aaron Sorkin – Molly’s Game

Jack Thorne, Steve Conrad, Stephen Chbosky – Wonder

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Roger Deakins – Blade Runner 2049

Hoyte van Hoytema – Dunkirk

Dan Laustsen – The Shape of Water

Rachel Morrison – Mudbound

Sayombhu Mukdeeprom – Call Me By Your Name

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Paul Denham Austerberry, Shane Vieau, Jeff Melvin – The Shape of Water

Jim Clay, Rebecca Alleway – Murder on the Orient Express

Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis – Dunkirk

Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola – Blade Runner 2049

Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer – Beauty and the Beast

Mark Tildesley, Véronique Melery – Phantom Thread

BEST EDITING

Michael Kahn, Sarah Broshar – The Post

Paul Machliss, Jonathan Amos – Baby Driver

Lee Smith – Dunkirk

Joe Walker – Blade Runner 2049

Sidney Wolinsky – The Shape of Water

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Renée April – Blade Runner 2049

Mark Bridges – Phantom Thread

Jacqueline Durran – Beauty and the Beast

Lindy Hemming – Wonder Woman

Luis Sequeira – The Shape of Water

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP

Beauty and the Beast

Darkest Hour

I, Tonya

The Shape of Water

Wonder

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Blade Runner 2049

Dunkirk

The Shape of Water

Thor: Ragnarok

War for the Planet of the Apes

Wonder Woman

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

The Breadwinner

Coco

Despicable Me 3

The LEGO Batman Movie

Loving Vincent

BEST ACTION MOVIE

Baby Driver

Logan

Thor: Ragnarok

War for the Planet of the Apes

Wonder Woman

BEST COMEDY

The Big Sick

The Disaster Artist

Girls Trip

I, Tonya

Lady Bird

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY

Steve Carell – Battle of the Sexes

James Franco – The Disaster Artist

Chris Hemsworth – Thor: Ragnarok

Kumail Nanjiani – The Big Sick

Adam Sandler – The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY

Tiffany Haddish – Girls Trip

Zoe Kazan – The Big Sick

Margot Robbie – I, Tonya

Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird

Emma Stone – Battle of the Sexes

BEST SCI-FI OR HORROR MOVIE

Blade Runner 2049

Get Out

It

The Shape of Water

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

BPM (Beats Per Minute)

A Fantastic Woman

First They Killed My Father

In the Fade

The Square

Thelma

BEST SONG

Evermore – Beauty and the Beast

Mystery of Love – Call Me By Your Name

Remember Me – Coco

Stand Up for Something – Marshall

This Is Me – The Greatest Showman

BEST SCORE

Alexandre Desplat – The Shape of Water

Jonny Greenwood – Phantom Thread

Dario Marianelli – Darkest Hour

Benjamin Wallfisch and Hans Zimmer – Blade Runner 2049

John Williams – The Post

Hans Zimmer – Dunkirk

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