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Beyonce got candid during her recent Elle U.K interview and opened up about the pressures of being perfect. Because lets be honest, she is. But for the multi Grammy Award winner, who is the publication’s May cover girl, she’s finally learned that it’s all about “purpose” not “perfection.”

Here are three things we learned from the King Bey’s recent chat with Elle, including her efforts to remain a positive force within the industry.

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It’s About Purpose: According to the pop star, it took a while before she finally embraced how God made her. “It’s really about changing the conversation. It’s not about perfection. It’s about purpose,” Beyoncé, who celebrated her with wedding anniversary with Jay Z, explained. “We have to care about our bodies and what we put in them. Women have to take the time to focus on our mental health—take time for self, for the spiritual, without feeling guilty or selfish. The world will see you the way you see you, and treat you the way you treat yourself.”

New Active Ivy Park Is To Celebrate A Woman’s Body: “It’s really the essence: to celebrate every woman and the body she’s in while always striving to be better. I called it Ivy Park because a park is our commonality,” the singer said. “We can all go there; we’re all welcomed. It’s anywhere we create for ourselves.”

The Park Is A Safe Place For Beyonce: “For me, it’s the place that my drive comes from,” Beyoncé shared, while talking about Ivy Park. “I think we all have that place we go to when we need to fight through something, set our goals and accomplish them.”

Owning A Company Is A “Burden And A Blessing:” “It’s exciting, but having the power to make every final decision and being accountable for them is definitely a burden and a blessing. To me, power is making things happen without asking for permission,” the 34-year-old revealed. “It’s affecting the way people perceive themselves and the world around them. It’s making people stand up with pride.”

Bey’s issue hits newsstands on April 5.

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‘GQ’ Cover Star LeBron James Has Hard Yet Necessary Convo W/ His Kids About Racism

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It is a conversation that is difficult yet necessary: Racism.

For LeBron James, that conversation was had in depth after someone spray pained the N-word all over his Brentwood home. In a new interview with GQ magazine, the November cover star opened up about the emotional discussion with his sons and daughter.

“It’s heavy when a situation occurs either with myself or with someone in a different city, i.e., Trayvon, Mike Brown. I have to go home and talk to my 13- and 10-year-old sons, even my 2-year-old daughter, about what it means to grow up being an African-American in America,” he said about feeling the “twoness” in America.

He continued, “Because no matter how great you become in life, no matter how wealthy you become, how people worship you, or what you do, if you are an African-American man or African-American woman, you will always be that.”

James explained, “True colors will show, and it showed for me during the playoffs, where my house in Brentwood, California, one of the f*cking best neighborhoods in America, was vandalized with, you know, the N-word. And that shit puts it all back into perspective. So do I use my energy toward that? Or do I now shed a light on how I can use this negative to turn into a positive, because so many people are looking for what I’m going to say.”

That’s when he unveiled, “I had a conversation with my kids. I let them know this is what it is, this is how it’s going to be. When it’s time for y’all to fly, you’ll have to understand that. When y’all go out in public and y’all start driving or y’all start moving around, be respectful to cops, as much as you can. When you get pulled over, call your mom or dad, put it on speakerphone, and put your phone underneath the seat. But be respectful the whole time.”

Earlier this year multiple LAPD units responded to James’ California home when neighbors saw the word scrawled on the outer gate. At the time, James suggested that when it comes to racial inequality, “we have a long way to go.”

Click here to read James’ entire GQ article.

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