NEWS

Cory Goldstein Speaks: Dreadlocks Don’t Exclusively Belong To Colored Community

By  | 

Cory Goldstein, a 22-year-old Environmental Science major at San Francisco State University, is speaking out after his hairstyle became a trending topic this week. Cory, who happens to be White if you haven’t noticed, says that Bonita Tindle harassed him down two flights of stairs over his dreadlocks, accusing him of being a cultural appropriator while physically blocking him from going around her.

“I tried to leave multiple time and she wouldn’t let me. She kept grabbing me, pushing me back, trying to make her point or something. I didn’t want to talk or discuss the situation with her at all,” Goldstein explains in an interview with Xpress News.

“It’s not even part of the colored community’s culture. It may be ingrained in it, but it’s ingrained in so many other cultures than that,” Goldstein says. The student is right if you’re a person that lives in a fact based world. The Ngagpas monks of Tibet wear dreadlocks. Celts, Nordic Vikings and Ancient Egyptians wore them as well.

“When people wear Native American headdresses, I feel like that is cultural appropriation because that is something that solely is within their culture that they use for empowerment. Only people of high standing within that community can have headdresses … Someone having locks, something that is found universally across the world, not just within African culture but everywhere actually, that is not cultural appropriation in my view.”

Tindle has yet to record an interview defending her behavior, but we’re sure it’s coming.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *