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R. Kelly recently stormed out of a HuffPost Live interview after being asked about the one thing reporters usually stay away from: Alleged sexual abuse.

But now, the singer is has had a change of heart and is opening up about his troubled past, including, allegations that he sexually abused young girls, something he tackles directly.

Here are seven things we learned from the Pied Piper’s recent, more than candid GQ article titled: Confessions of R. Kelly.  

Does Not Like Sleeping With Underage Girls: “I think, man, abso-effing-lutely I’ve been treated unfair. Yes. I’m not, you know, this innocent guy with a halo over his head. No, I love women. Do I like to sleep with underage girls? Absolutely not. I’ve said it a million times. But do I have people trying to destroy my career? Absolutely.”

He Was Sexually Abused As A Child: We first heard about Kelly being sexually abused in his 2012 memoir, Soulacoaster, a topic the singer “put so far in the back of my mind that I even forgot about it.” The artist tells the publication, “I didn’t want that to be something that was in my luggage once I got to my success home, so to speak.”

In the article, the singer details being abused by a family friend, who was a man. “It was a crazy weird experience,” he tells me. “But not a full-blown experience, because it didn’t go down. Contact sexual—no. A visual—absolutely. A visual from him showing me his penis and all that stuff.”

He added,  “I remember it feeling weird. I remember feeling ashamed. I remember closing my eyes or keeping my hands over my eyes. I remember those things, but couldn’t judge it one way or the other fully.”

According to Kelly, the abuse went on from “about [age] 7 or 8 to maybe 14, 15. Something like that.”

Agrees Sexual Abuse Gets Passed Down From Generation To Generation [But he broke it]: “Well, you know, just like poverty—poverty was a generational curse in my family, too, but I decided that I’m gonna stop that curse. I’m not gonna be broke, like my mom was broke, my uncles were broke, my sisters didn’t have money, my cousins on down. Generational curse doesn’t mean that the curse can’t be broken. Just like having no father, that’s a generational curse. Which is why, when my kids were born, I was Bill Cosby in the house. You know, the good one. You know, let’s be clear there: how we saw Bill Cosby when we were coming up.”

R. Kelly Won’t Reveal If He Was Man In Sexual Video: In 2002, a video surfaced of what appeared to be R. Kelly, having sexual relations with a young girl. In the clip, the man, who many thought was the singer, even pees on the young girl. The case took six years to go to trial, but when it did, not all parties, including the girl cooperated. He was eventually found not guilty.

But when asked if that was him in the video, Kelly responded to the reporter: “Because of my lawyers, to this day I cannot have those kind of conversations. Being advised by my lawyers in this … Because they could come back to haunt me. Things could come back and they can just restart all over again. And I have to protect myself.”

So why wouldn’t it be easier to jus say, “no, that’s not me?”: “Not necessarily. Because I’ve said certain things when it all first started, but that didn’t do no good. So I had to go get lawyers and they had to protect me. So now I’m under my lawyers’ advice.”

Kelly Would Never Give A Golden Shower: When asked if this is something he would enjoy as part of sex, he responded, “Absolutely not.” Later adding, under no circumstances.

R. Kelly Still Sleeps In His Closet: While on the topic of his hit “Trapped in the Closet,” the singer addressed rumors that he used to sleep in his closet. “I still do,” he said.

“Most of the times, it’s just peace of mind. First of all, it’s a pretty big closet. There’s a few reasons. The way the sunlight comes through the window, when I wake I don’t like it,” he said. “I like pitch-black, because I sleep well when it’s just pitch-black. I leave my phones outside of the closet, and once I get in that closet I feel like no one in the world has any idea that I am in this closet right now. And that gives me a peace of mind, to know that no one knows where I’m at right now. ‘I bet you they can’t find me here.’ So it’s that kind of thought.”

The singer then admitted that it is a way of hiding from people. “Uh, in a way, yeah. And I feel so secure. I’ve got the front door locked, I got the back door locked, I got the room door locked, and I got the closet door locked. I’m in a door in a door in a door in a door, so I feel protected. Just like the way they put money in a thick vault. So, call me money at that point.”

R. Kelly Calls Sexual Abuse Accusers Liars: After acknowledging that he settled with others who have accused him of underage sex, he told the publication, “It wasn’t many. It wasn’t like it was a whole ton of people. But the people that did were absolutely lying. Absolutely.”

Why would they do that?Look, if I break up with a girl, and she don’t wanna break up, and I’m R. Kelly, she’s gonna be pissed. So pissed that she’s gonna go out there, she’s gonna say this, she’s gonna say that, she’s gonna say the other. And if she’s really pissed, whoever she said it to is gonna spread the rumor, and if the wrong people get ahold of that rumor, that’s gonna come out. If that come out, I gotta get a lawyer, and once I get that lawyer, that lawyer gonna tell me to shut up. Because no matter what you say, you’re gonna look bad. Okay, so now it goes from that to ‘Oh, they’re really serious, they want to sue you.’ What the lawyers tell me? ‘You should settle. Your album’s coming out. You have a GQ front cover coming out, you have BET next week, you have the Grammys coming up. Wrong or right, you can win the battle and lose the war. It’s on you, but that’s what we advise you to do.’ I go home, I think about all my hard work, I look at my studio, I look at my kids, I look at my wife at the time, or any other time, and I say, ‘I don’t want to settle.’ I want to fight because I know I’m right, I know I’m innocent, have nothing to hide—she wanted me, I wanted her, she was of age, I’m of age. But she’ll say, ‘Well, I didn’t meet him here, I met him then.’ That’s what they’re saying.”

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‘GQ’ Cover Star LeBron James Has Hard Yet Necessary Convo W/ His Kids About Racism

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It is a conversation that is difficult yet necessary: Racism.

For LeBron James, that conversation was had in depth after someone spray pained the N-word all over his Brentwood home. In a new interview with GQ magazine, the November cover star opened up about the emotional discussion with his sons and daughter.

“It’s heavy when a situation occurs either with myself or with someone in a different city, i.e., Trayvon, Mike Brown. I have to go home and talk to my 13- and 10-year-old sons, even my 2-year-old daughter, about what it means to grow up being an African-American in America,” he said about feeling the “twoness” in America.

He continued, “Because no matter how great you become in life, no matter how wealthy you become, how people worship you, or what you do, if you are an African-American man or African-American woman, you will always be that.”

James explained, “True colors will show, and it showed for me during the playoffs, where my house in Brentwood, California, one of the f*cking best neighborhoods in America, was vandalized with, you know, the N-word. And that shit puts it all back into perspective. So do I use my energy toward that? Or do I now shed a light on how I can use this negative to turn into a positive, because so many people are looking for what I’m going to say.”

That’s when he unveiled, “I had a conversation with my kids. I let them know this is what it is, this is how it’s going to be. When it’s time for y’all to fly, you’ll have to understand that. When y’all go out in public and y’all start driving or y’all start moving around, be respectful to cops, as much as you can. When you get pulled over, call your mom or dad, put it on speakerphone, and put your phone underneath the seat. But be respectful the whole time.”

Earlier this year multiple LAPD units responded to James’ California home when neighbors saw the word scrawled on the outer gate. At the time, James suggested that when it comes to racial inequality, “we have a long way to go.”

Click here to read James’ entire GQ article.

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