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Exclusive: “Black-ish” Debuts With Strong Ratings, Tracee Ellis Ross & Anthony Anderson Explain Why

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On Wednesday night the world finally found out exactly what Black-ish is when the sitcom made it’s debut on ABC. The show which follows an affluent Black family trying to keep their children culturally grounded, opened strong following Modern Family in the 9:30 p.m. slot.  The first episode drew a 3.3 rating with adults 18-49 and 10.8 million viewers.

But before it hit primetime HipHollywood got an exclusive invite on set to chat with the shows stars Anthony Anthony and Tracee Ellis Ross to get their take on the shows controversial title and why audiences relate to the show.

“We’re dealing with issues that’s everyone goes through we’re just Black doing it,” explained Anderson who is also one of the executive producers of the show.

Added Ross, “I think we’re in a time in our society where Black is something that can’t be clearly defined, and for this family, what are we holding on to, is it about culture, is it about tradition, is it about race, and what are we passing on to our children and the “isn” makes it more modern.”

Ross like her character Rainbow is bi racial, but Ross made it clear to us, she knows all about the struggles black women go through especially with our hair.

You can see more of these two on Black-ish Wednesday nights at 8pm on ABC.

EXCLUSIVES

Netflix’s ‘Step Sisters’ Is ‘Bring It On’ … But Way More Woke!

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Netflix is getting ready to “Bring It On” … in more ways than one. The streaming service’s new flick Step Sisters is reminiscent of the 90s dance film, but delves deeper into racial themes like cultural appropriation, tokenization and interracial dating.

In the film Megalyn Echikunwoke (Arrow) plays the president of a black sorority who is tasked with teaching one of the campus’ white sororities how to step for a charity competition. At first glimpse the film seems to be stepping into a can of worms — and had folks on Twitter up in arms, but the creators and cast told HipHollywood it isn’t about cultural appropriation but instead cultural exchange.

“There’s a strong political message, and there’s a lot of racial content,” said Nia Jervier. “But I think that the pill that may be difficult to swallow is dipped in honey, because it’s funny.”

What also helps is that producer/writers like Lena Waithe (Masters of None), Chuck Hayward (Dear White People) and Ben Cory Jones (Underground) are behind the project – so you know it’s woke.

“At the end of the day, Jamila the lead character in our minds she’s reaching over to show them a part of our culture. It doesn’t dilute our culture,” said Jones. ” And I love that we can take stepping and evolve that into issues of race and culture.”

Step Sisters begins streaming on Netflix January 20th.

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